What is Ester?

Esters are derived from substitution reaction of carboxylic acid and alcohol with elimination of water. Esters are a sweet-smelling substance. Additionally, they can be turned into polymers known as polyesters. Oils and fats are the best examples of esters. To differentiate between oil and fat, is measured by the melting point. If the melting point is lower than the room temperature, then it’s said to be oil (typically vegetable oil) or when the ester remains solid at room temperature its considered to be a fat.

Classification

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Isopropyl Esters

(Iso Propyl Myristate, Iso Propyl Palmitate, Iso Propyl Laurate, !so Propyl Oleate)

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Glycerol Esters

(Caprylic / Capric Trigylceride, Glycerol Trioleate)

 

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Butyl Esters

(N – butyl stearate)

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Ethylhexyl Esters

(Ethylhexyl palmitate, ethylhexyl stearate, ethylhexyl oleate)

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Methyl Esters

(Methyl Laurate, Methyl Oleate)

Functional Areas

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Preservatives
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Sweet Scent & Flavor
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Low Volatility
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Lubricant

Application

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Personal Care & Cosmetics Industry

Thickening Agent, Emollient, Lubricant, Parabens

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Fragrance Industry

Solvent, Scent, Low Molecular Weight, Low Volatility

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Household & Industrial Use

Oxidative Stability, Defoamer, Emulsifier, Solvent

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Agrochemical Industry

Defoamer, Plasticizer, Solvent, Intermediate

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Food & Flavor Industry

Enhancer, Sweet Flavor, Preservative, Emulsifier

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Pharmaceutical Industry

Solvent, Plasticizer, Lubricant, Flavor